Listen to the Gary Glenn for State Senate radio ad featuring Charlton Heston

Gary Glenn was named co-recipient — with epic Hollywood actor Charlton Heston of St. Helen, Michigan — of the Center for the Study of Market Alternatives’ 1987 “Freedom Fighter of the Year” award. Gary persuaded Heston, a former president of the Screen Actors Guild, AFL-CIO, to appear in television advertisements and campaign events urging voter support for Right to Work.


LAPEER COUNTY PRESS: Glenn kicks off Senate campaign in county

Glenn_announcement.jpgRep. Gary Glenn announces his candidacy for state Senate with Lapeer County supporters.

"(Rep. Gary) Glenn noted his opposition to — and (former Rep. Kevin) Daley’s support for — Proposal One, (the $2 billion road tax increase) rejected by almost 90 percent of Lapeer County voters in May 2015.

On his bio, Glenn identifies himself as a 'conservative Republican.' He reiterated the point Friday. 'In looking at the voting record and track record of Lapeer County, it is a conservative county, so I’m your man,' Glenn said.

...Ruth Stahl, of North Branch, (wife of former state Rep. John Stahl, R-Arcadia Township) attended in support of Glenn. 'I just feel he’s the man for the job,' Stahl said."

Mayfield Twp. -- State Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Township, kicked off his campaign for state senate in Lapeer County on Friday, officially declaring intent to win the seat currently held by Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville.

When the election for the 31st district seat (representing Lapeer, Tuscola, and Bay counties) will be held, however, remains unknown.

According to a press release issued by Glenn on Friday, “Green may vacate the seat as soon as next month, a year before the end of his final term, if and when he receives a long-anticipated appointment to a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture…”

Since early 2017, Green has been rumored next in line for the position of director of Michigan’s U.S. Dept. of Agriculture rural development division — a position appointed by President Donald Trump. Green publicly confirmed in May that he’s up for the job. If he doesn’t get it, he will be term-limited out of office and can’t run again in 2018.

“I’m here today to officially announce my candidacy for the state senate seat made up of Bay, Lapeer, and Tuscola counties,” Glenn said at the Mayfield Township Hall. He had plans to stop in Tuscola and Bay counties later in the day.

Should Green be appointed, Glenn said Gov. Rick Snyder could either call for a special election in early 2018 or decide to let the Senate seat remain vacant until filled via the regularly scheduled election next November, leaving Lapeer County without a state senator for about a year.

At a Lapeer Tea Party meeting on Oct. 3, Glenn told The County Press “You can’t afford to bet the wrong way if there is going to be a special election in February — that’s four months from now.” At that meeting, he stopped short of announcing intent to run for the spot.

That changed just 10 days later.

“Senator Green is under instructions from the White House not to say anything, so he’s not going to tell you anything,” Glenn said Friday. “But we think that appointment may be imminent, and there’s a reasonable expectation of a special election primary the first Tuesday in February.”

“We were planning to make this announcement one way or another,” Glenn said. “It just turns out that it’s going to be perfectly timed in terms of there being a potential vacancy in the near future.”

If the special primary election is called for, Glenn would square off against former state Rep. Kevin Daley, of Arcadia Township, who announced his campaign in March when early rumors of Green’s potential employment became more well-known. A special general election would follow the primary in late March or early April.

Daley and Glenn have been travelling throughout the district in the last several weeks.

Re-elected to the state house in 2016, Glenn, 59, spoke Oct. 3 to the Lapeer County Tea Party Patriots at its regular monthly meeting, also held at the Mayfield Township Hall. About 25 people attended, including representatives of Green and U.S. Rep. Paul Mitchell, R-Dryden Township.

Glenn called the appearance part of a potential “job interview.”

Glenn talked about various accomplishments, from serving eight years in the U.S. Army Reserves and Army National Guard to his role as president of the American Family Association of Michigan since 1999, during which he co-authored the Marriage Protection Amendment approved by voters in 2004, and as a School Choice project manager for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.

Further, he talked about his previous role as chief of staff for a statewide livestock producers and feeders trade association.

Glenn was first elected to the state House of Representatives in 2014, serving the 98th district that consists of portions of Bay and Midland counties, including the City of Midland.

He is Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem and chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee, while also serving on the Military and Veterans Affairs, Communications and Technology, and Insurance committees.

A particular point of pride highlighted by Glenn during his two recent Lapeer visits is his being named 2015 “Freshman Legislator of the Year” by Michigan Information and Research Service (MIRS).

In announcing his candidacy, Glenn also highlighted some of his work in Lansing, including sponsoring or cosponsoring legislation to:

• Freeze further enrollment into the Medicaid expansion plan, which he says was the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Michigan.

• Repeal Michigan’s ballast water release regulations, which Glenn says are blocking development of the Saginaw Bay as a deep water port, which would allow much cheaper shipping costs for the export of farm and manufacturing products produced in mid-Michigan.

• Repeal so-called “Common Core” standards and allow each local school district to set its own standards.

• Repeal the requirement for a government fee and permit to carry a concealed weapon.

• Repeal the senior citizens pension tax.

Glenn said Friday he was persuaded to run for the state Senate position by “individuals and major area employers who believe my long-term leadership and impact on public policy, especially energy policy, will help make Michigan more competitive in the future for new industry, new agricultural production and processing, and new jobs.”

In the press release and Lapeer appearance on Friday, Glenn noted his opposition to — and Daley’s support for — Proposal One, rejected by almost 90 percent of Lapeer County voters in May 2015.

On his bio, Glenn identifies himself as a “conservative Republican.”

He reiterated the point Friday.

“In looking at the voting record and track record of Lapeer County, it is a conservative county and so I’m your man,” Glenn said.

From Williams Township in Bay County, Glenn pointed out that he moved there — and into the state Senate’s 31st district — only recently and because he and his wife became empty nesters, “long before there was any political implication to where we might end up living.”

Williams Township is about 75 miles from the city of Lapeer.

If elected, Glenn said he and his representatives will maintain a regular presence in Lapeer County.

“I plan to be here often, and have staff that would be here and very attentive to Lapeer County,” Glenn said. “Of the three counties, it — if you judge it by the number of people who voted against Proposal One — is the most conservative of the three counties so this is the one where I feel most at home.”

Twelve people were in attendance at Glenn’s mid-morning announcement.

Ruth Stahl, of North Branch, attended in support of Glenn. “I just feel he’s the man for the job,” Stahl said. “He’s been around Lansing and Michigan a long time. I feel like he knows what’s going on and will be a great help.”


TUSCOLA COUNTY ADVERTISER: Rep. Gary Glenn announces candidacy for state senator

“I’m here because I believe in Gary Glenn. He stands up for my values, he stands up for what I believe in. ...He’s the right guy for the job. ...I just want to leave with you the fact that he’s the guy I want as our next state senator.”
Sen. Mike Green

Glenn_and_Green_II.jpegSen. Mike Green, left, with Rep. Gary Glenn at Glenn's announcement for state Senator in Caro.

Caro, Mich. -- Michigan state Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Township, announced his candidacy Friday for Michigan’s 31st District State Senate seat.

Glenn currently represents Michigan’s 98th legislative district, which encompasses portions of Bay and Midland counties. He is the Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem.

Glenn made the announcement late Friday morning at the Rolka building, located on State Street (M-81) in Caro.

“When I look at the attributes that we ought to have in a state senator, I would suggest that we need someone with a track record of proven leadership,” Glenn said at the announcement. “Not just another vote in the House of Representatives.”

The timing, however, of Glenn’s senate run is unclear. The 31st State Senate District includes Bay, Tuscola and Lapeer counties, and is currently occupied by Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville. In Michigan, state Senate seats are term-limited to two, four-year terms, and Green’s second term will be complete on Jan. 1, 2019.

But Green may cease being a state senator before that. According to a press release from Glenn’s office, “Green may vacate the seat as soon as next month, a year before the end of his final term, if and when he receives a long-anticipated appointment to a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, with Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder expected to call a special primary election to fill that vacancy as early as the first Tuesday in February, with a special general election following in late March or early April.”

Whether Green receives the appointment or not, Glenn will run for Michigan State Senate, he said.

“I am a candidate for the state senate,” Glenn said. “Either way, if there’s a special election, or whether it’s the normal election cycle.”

Glenn was joined in Caro Friday by his wife, Annette Glenn, Green and a handful of supporters.

“I’m here because I believe in Gary Glenn,” Green said. “He stands up for my values, he stands up for what I believe in. He’s probably a little more right of me on a lot of things, but he’s the right guy for the job.”

Although Green offered his support for Glenn, he couldn’t endorse him officially.
“I will tell you I can’t give (Glenn) an official endorsement because of where I’m likely to be shortly, hopefully soon,” Green said. “But I just want to leave with you the fact that he’s the guy I want as our next state senator.”

Glenn was originally elected to the Michigan House of Representatives in 2014, and is in his second term. The term limit on the House is a maximum of three, two-year terms. In addition to being Associate Speaker, Glenn is chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee and serves on the House Communications, Insurance, and Military and Veterans Affairs committees.

He served in the U.S. Army, which went a long way toward his decision to work in public service.

“I spent eight years in the Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserves,” Glenn said. “And I’ve searched my heart as to why I’ve cared so much, so motivated, so passionate about doing my part to help preserve the values on which this country was founded. The answer I came to was having been raised by a World War II Marine who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor.

“He taught me to love my country, to stand up for what I believe in, and fight for the ones I love.”

Glenn is a cancer survivor, having been diagnosed about 18 months ago, he said.
He pointed out that during his initial Michigan House run, he used a familiar slogan.
“When I first ran for office in 2014 for the state House of Representatives, my slogan was ‘Make Michigan Great Again,’” Glenn said. “That was before (President Donald Trump) used it, but the truth is, I’m sure he and I both stole it from Ronald Reagan in 1980.”

If the likely scenario occurs where Green is appointed a spot with the Department of Agriculture, then a primary election would happen in early 2018. Glenn would face Kevin Daley, and possibly others, for the Republican candidacy in that primary election. Daley is a former Michigan representative out of Lapeer County.

“How the numbers break down in the early polling, I will, according to the polls, win substantially in Bay County,” Glenn said. “And Mr. Daley will substantially win Lapeer County and we’ll balance each other out. So Tuscola County gets to pick the next state senator is what it boils down to.”

Bay County Clerk Cindy Luczak has announced she will run for the 31st District seat as a Democrat in the regular November, 2018 election.

With a campaign trail now on the horizon, Glenn announced a 40-person-strong organization will spearhead his election efforts in Tuscola County. Mike Green’s son, Phil Green, will serve as chairman of Glenn’s Tuscola County campaign.


Glenn announces candidacy for state Senate

Bay City, Mich. -- Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Twp., in his second term representing parts of Bay and Midland counties in the state House of Representatives, Friday announced his candidacy for the 31st District state Senate seat comprised of Bay, Lapeer, and Tuscola counties, which is currently held by term-limited Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville.

Green earlier this year told the Midland Daily News that he "would be a strong supporter of Gary Glenn" to succeed him in the Senate.

Glenn made the announcement surrounded by supporters at three events held in Lapeer, Caro, and Bay City. Former state Sen. Joel Gougeon, R-Bay City, will chair Glenn's campaign in Bay County, while Phil Green, the current senator's son, will chair Glenn's organization in Tuscola County. Mayfield Twp. Supervisor Dianna Ireland will chair the campaign in Lapeer County.

Glenn said he was persuaded to run for the position by "individuals and major area employers who believe my long-term leadership and impact on public policy, especially energy policy, will help make Michigan more competitive in the future for new industry and new farm and manufacturing jobs."

"The single biggest cost of doing business for Dow Chemical, the single largest employer in mid-Michigan, and for large agricultural processing plants, is the cost of electricity," said Glenn, who serves as chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee. "Among those I asked for counsel, the verdict was unanimous that the chance to serve eight years in the state Senate would allow me to have more impact on that issue and be of more value to mid-Michigan families, farms, employers, and our economy than serving one remaining two-year term in the House."

Michigan's term limits law allows a maximum of three two-year terms in the state House, and two four-year terms in the state Senate.

But Green may vacate the seat as soon as next month, a year before the end of his final term, if and when he receives a long-anticipated appointment to a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, with Gov. Rick Snyder expected to call a special primary election to fill that vacancy as early as the first Tuesday in February, with a special general election following in late March or early April. Snyder could also decide to let the Senate seat remain vacant until filled by the regular election process in November 2018.

First elected in November 2014, Glenn was chosen by reporters with the state Capitol's oldest daily news service from among 55 first-term state representatives and senators as "Freshman Legislator of the Year," based on his leadership and impact on energy policy and civil asset forfeiture reform.

The Michigan Schools Energy Cooperative, whose president is Tuscola Intermediate School District Supt. Gene Pierce, last year presented Glenn an award for his leadership in successful legislative efforts to preserve schools' ability to purchase electricity from sources other than the state's two monopoly utilities, Consumers Energy and Detroit Edison, saving public schools $17 million a year. Bay City Schools saves $200,000 a year, and Lapeer Public Schools in recent years have saved $2 million.

Glenn was also named "Legislator of the Year" by the Associated Builders and Contractors of Michigan and by the Propane Dealers Association of Michigan.

He received the American Conservative Union's "Award for Conservative Excellence" for compiling the most conservative voting record in the House on fiscal, social, and veterans-related issues and is consistently ranked by numerous scorecards as among the most conservative members of the House.

In 2015, Glenn was a leader in the campaign against Proposal One, the $2 billion fuel and sales tax increase overwhelmingly rejected by Michigan voters on a statewide ballot in May of that year.

See this Saginaw News story.

Former state Rep. Kevin Daley, R-Lum, who will be Glenn's opponent in the Republican primary for Green's state Senate seat, voted in favor of the $2 billion tax hike proposal.

See this Lapeer County Press story.

Senate District 31 voters overwhelmingly agreed with Glenn and disagreed with Daley on the issue, rejecting the massive tax hike with 85 percent voting NO in Bay County, 88 percent voting NO in Tuscola, and almost 90 percent voting NO in Lapeer!

Glenn was reelected to a second term in November 2016 with over 60 percent of the vote, winning 48 out of 50 precincts in the 98th House District and losing the remaining two by a combined total of six votes. He won all precincts in the Bay County portion of his district.

As chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee, he has pledged to protect the authority of local townships and counties to decide whether to allow the development of industrial wind projects in the Great Lakes Bay Region.

Glenn has also sponsored or cosponsored legislation to:

* Repeal Michigan's ballast water release regulations, which are blocking development of Bay City as a deep water port for the export of farm and manufacturing products from mid-Michigan.

* Repeal so-called "Common Core" standards and allow each local school district to set its own standards.

* Repeal the requirement for a government fee and permit to carry a concealed weapon.

* Repeal the senior citizens pension tax.

Prior to being elected to the House, Glenn had served as president of the American Family Association of Michigan since 1999, during which he coauthored the Marriage Protection Amendment overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2004, and as a School Choice project manager for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.

Glenn faced a major health challenge during his first term. In January 2016, he was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer which had consumed the next to the last vertebrae in his spinal column. Doctors declared him to be in remission five weeks later, and cancer specialists at the University of Michigan this year characterized the remission as stable. Glenn has never missed a vote, committee meeting, or caucus in Lansing, even while undergoing radiation and five months of chemotherapy which doctors recommended as an insurance policy after his remission.

Glenn was so fatigued by the chemotherapy that he used a wheelchair at the Republican National Convention in July of last year. Now nearly fully recovered, he undergoes an intense workout multiple times a week with a former Army fitness instructor and race walks two or three miles multiple times each weekend.

His destroyed vertebrae, which a neurosurgeon initially said would have to be surgically replaced with a titanium cage, grew back naturally instead, out of nothing. Doctors termed Glenn "unusually responsive," but he credited his recovery instead to the thousands of prayers offered for him and his family and said he again has the strength, energy, and stamina for what's expected to be a hotly-contested primary and general election.

Glenn is expected to face Daley in the Republican primary, and Bay County Clerk Cindy Luczak will run for the seat as a Democrat in the regular November 2018 election process, but will not be a candidate in a special election if one is held earlier next year. If no other candidates file for the seat, Glenn will once again be the only veteran in the race, having served eight years in the U.S. Army Reserves and Army National Guard. He is serving his second term on the House Military and Veterans Affairs Committee.

Glenn and his wife Annette and five children moved to Larkin Township in Midland County in the spring of 1998. After their last child left home in May of this year, the Glenns began looking for a new home and downsized in August to a townhouse located in Williams Township in Bay County. Their second oldest son played two years of football and graduated from Bay City Western High School in Auburn.


State Sen. Mike Green supports Gary Glenn to replace him in the Senate

"I'd be a strong supporter of (Rep. Gary Glenn) to replace me for whatever reason. I hope he does run if there is an opening."
Sen. Mike Green, Gongwer News, Lansing, July 3, 2017

"When asked about the possible position with the Department of Agriculture, (Sen. Mike) Green's only comment was that, 'If the (state Senate) position opens up, I would be a strong supporter of Gary Glenn.'"
Midland Daily News, July 6, 2017


MIDLAND DAILY NEWS: Eastlawn students visit state representative

 Glenn_school_visit_II.jpg

Eastlawn Elementary School fourth graders, taught by teacher Kelly Kraatz, far right, visited state Rep. Gary Glenn's office at the state Capitol in Lansing this summer. Glenn, back row center, visited the same class in Midland last winter to read Dr. Seuss's 'Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose' during March is Reading Month.

Click here for the article.


Rep. Glenn: ‘Illegal’ MPSC ruling highlights need for reform

Rep. Gary Glenn, chair of the House Energy Policy Committee, today said he will consider proposals to reform the Michigan Public Service Commission in the aftermath of a ruling he said violates the intent of state law and could raise costs for utility customers.

The committee heard testimony related to last week’s MPSC ruling that Glenn said threatens to undermine Michigan’s electric choice program, which has saved millions of dollars for schools, businesses and residents across the state.

“Unaccountable, unelected bureaucrats are attempting to dismantle an energy law adopted for the people by their representatives in the Legislature,” Glenn said. “We cannot allow this action, which I consider to be illegal under the new state law. It is one of the reasons we intend to come forward with multiple proposals for broad-based reform for the MPSC.”

Those reforms could include adding to the MPSC’s current three-commissioner format to include more representation for ratepayers, qualification requirements for commissioners, stronger protections against conflicts of interest and other improvements to better serve Michigan, Glenn said.

Glenn, R-Williams Township, said the reform proposal will be separate from one already in the works to overturn last week’s MPSC ruling related to in-state power generation requirements.

The MPSC is drafting rules to implement new state energy laws approved late last year. Friday, the utility regulator outlined plans to require alternative energy suppliers who compete with Michigan’s electricity monopolies – Consumers Energy and Detroit Edison – to prove they can supply their customers using electricity generated in Michigan.

While some specifics have not yet been decided, Glenn said the in-state electricity could be far more expensive than if it were generated elsewhere, driving up utility costs for schools, residents and businesses in electric choice programs.
Glenn said lawmakers clearly removed the in-state generation requirement from the new energy law before it was finalized. He disagreed with testimony today from MPSC chair Sally Talberg.

“If that language had not been removed, the Legislature never would have approved the new state law in the first place,” Glenn said. “It was a key compromise to ensure its passage. It seems that everybody knew what the compromise was except the MPSC.”

As stated in a letter this summer to the MPSC from state Reps. Chris Afendoulis and Rob VerHeulen, the final language in Michigan’s new energy law “clearly allows” alternative energy suppliers to use any resource allowed by the Midwest’s federally regulated regional electricity grid manager “to meet capacity obligations without reference to local resources.” The legislators wrote they believe the MPSC’s requirement would be “contrary to the legislative intent and final compromise” of the new energy law.

Schools and business groups are among those supporting Glenn’s position.
The Michigan Chemistry Council and the Grand Rapids Area Chamber of Commerce testified in the Energy Policy Committee earlier this month in support of his position. Others who have sent letters to the MPSC sharing Glenn’s view include the Michigan Chamber of Commerce and the Association of Business Advocating Tariff Equity – a group of major manufacturers including Dow Chemical Company, Hemlock Semiconductor, General Motors, Marathon Petroleum, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and U.S. Steel.

In a July letter to the MPSC, the Michigan Schools Energy Cooperative said its electricity choice program has saved participating Michigan schools over $140 million – or $35 per student per year. That is money returned directly to the classroom.

“This fight is not over,” Glenn said of the efforts to preserve electric choice in Michigan. “This fight is too important to be over.”


State Rep. Gary Glenn Honors First Responders on 9/11 Rememberance Day

Rep. Gary Glenn with Midland City Fire Chief Chris Coughlin and Assistant Chief Josh Mosher as his guests for the 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony at the state Capitol in Lansing.


Rep. Glenn joins the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Action Network

WLEW RADIO -- "Last week, the Tuscola County Relay for Life was held at the Stamats Field at Caro High School. ...At the 'Fight Back' ceremony, state Representative Gary Glenn shared that he had become a member of the American Cancer Society's Cancer Action Network, a non-partisan interest group that stays informed on any cancer legislation that goes through the state or federal legislature. ...Glenn is also a prostate cancer survivor."

Click here for the report.


MIDLAND DAILY NEWS: Michigan Propane Gas Association names Glenn Legislator of the Year

Glenn_-_Propane_legislator_of_the_year.jpg

State Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Larkin Twp., left, has been named Legislator of the Year by the Michigan Propane Gas Association during the group's annual conference. Presenting the award were Dave Long, Marlette, center, MPGA president, and Wayne Kohley, Fruitport, chairman of MPGA's government relations committee. Brian Lincoln, Gary Shepherd and Jeremy Stanford, all of Stanford L.P. Gas in Midland, also serve as committee chairs for MPGA. The group said it honored Glenn for 'his commitment to a competitive free market and level playing field for production and sales of energy in Michigan.'

Click here for the article.