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    Soros-funded front for Podesta think tank targets Rep. Gary Glenn

    The political arm of a national left-wing think tank led by Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, D-South Dakota, is running Internet ads attacking state Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Twp., a full year before the November 2018 election.

    Glenn, a long-time conservative activist before being elected to the state House of Representatives in 2014, was presented an award after his first year in office by the American Conservative Union for compiling the most conservative voting record in the House in 2015 on fiscal, social, and military and veteran-related issues. He received the same award a second time for maintaining the most conservative record in the House in 2016, after which he was reelected by over 60 percent of the vote, winning 48 out of 50 precincts. Now in his second term, Glenn serves as Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem and chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee.

    Glenn said Friday that as a conservative, he's flattered.

    "As a conservative, I take it as affirmation that a national-level left-wing hit group, run and funded by some of the biggest celebrities of the progressive socialist universe, think I threaten their leftist agenda sufficiently that they need to spend George Soros' money attacking me a full year before the election," Glenn said. "It certainly is my intention to do whatever I can, wherever I am, to help defeat the Left's oppressive big-government, freedom-killing, job-destroying, socialist tax-and-spend political agenda."

    Last month, Glenn announced plans to run in 2018 for an open state Senate seat representing Bay, Lapeer, and Tuscola counties.

    But starting even before Glenn announced his candidacy, Google users who search for Glenn's name have found at the top of the list of results a web advertisement -- identified as sponsored by ThinkProgress.org -- which states, "Gary Glenn is too extreme...Hate group leader turned MI Senator (sic) says being gay should be a crime."

    The ad links to a 2016 ThinkProgress.org article in which Glenn -- who serves as president of the American Family Association of Michigan, a conservative Christian traditional values advocacy group -- was quoted as saying, "We believe that states should be free to regulate and prohibit behavior that’s a violation of community standards and a proven threat to public health and safety -- including, as most of the United States did throughout its history, homosexual behavior.” 

    The quote, which Glenn in a news release confirmed is accurate, was a 2010 comment referencing the U.S. Supreme Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence v. Texas, in which six members of the court voted to overturn a Texas law outlawing homosexual sodomy. Three U.S. Supreme Court justices -- Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas -- agreed with Glenn's "states rights" position.

    The article also states: "Last year, Glenn spoke out against a Planet Fitness policy that resulted in a Midland, Michigan woman having her membership cancelled after she spent several days complaining about a transgender woman (a man) she saw using the (women's) bathroom at her gym. 'Planet Fitness obviously should rethink its anti-woman, anti-reality policy,' Glenn said. 'If they don’t, they shouldn’t be surprised in a conservative family-friendly community such as Midland if they lose more female members.'"

    According to its website, "ThinkProgress is an editorially independent project of the Center for American Progress Action Fund." 

    According to the Center for American Progress Action Fund's website, its board includes prominent left-wing politicians and academicians including Harold Ickes, who served as White House Deputy Chief of Staff for President Bill Clinton.

    The Action Fund's website reports that last year, it received $1 million or more from only one organization, the Center for American Progress. It also received six-figure funding from George Soros individually, his Open Society Policy Center, and the Service Employees International Union, plus five-figure contributions from the AFL-CIO and other individual unions, former Clinton Administration Secretary of State Madeline Albright, AT&T, Facebook, and other left-wing individuals and organizations. 

    The leadership of the Center for American Progress, according to its website, includes board member John Podesta, board chairman Tom Daschle, D-South Dakota, former U.S. Senate Majority Leader, and president Neera Tanden. 

    Tanden is also listed as CEO of the CAP Action Fund. 

    Podesta, now caught up in the scandal involving Russian involvement in the 2016 U.S. elections, served as a White House aide to both Bill Clinton and Barack Obama before chairing Hillary Clinton's losing 2016 presidential campaign.

    The New York Times -- under the headline, "Russia Scandal Befalls Two Brothers: John and Tony Podesta" -- reported last Friday: "In between campaign and White House stints, John Podesta helped to create and run some of the leading institutions on the American left, including the Center for American Progress think tank." 

    Glenn said the Soros-funded web of left-wing organizations may also be responsible for a lengthy telephone "push poll" -- received last week by voters in Lapeer and Tuscola counties -- that was also critical of Glenn.

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    Glenn receives second national award for most conservative record

    GG_official_House_photo_II.jpgLansing, Mi. -- Associate Speaker Pro Tem Gary Glenn, R-Williams Twp., chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee, has received for the second time a national-level award for compiling the most conservative voting record in the state House of Representatives.

    Glenn -- who in 2018 is running for the state Senate seat representing Bay, Lapeer, and Tuscola counties -- for the second year in a row was named recipient of the "Award for Conservative Excellence" by the American Conservative Union, a national organization founded in 1964 that promotes the "three-legged stool" of fiscally and socially conservative principles as well as a strong national defense.

    "It's a priority of mine to demonstrate, by example, that a legislator can be faithful to conservative principles of government and be effective at the same time. You don't have to compromise one to be the other," Glenn said. "That said, in the end, while rankings by outside groups are informative, the people of Bay and Midland counties will be the final judge of whether I've faithfully represented their values and views in Lansing."

    Glenn won the second award based on his 2016 voting record, in which he tied with two fellow Republicans -- Speaker Pro Tem Lee Chatfield, R-Levering, and Assistant Majority Leader Lana Theis, R-Brighton -- in voting conservative on 96 percent of the twenty-three roll call votes selected by the ACU.

    Glenn in 2015 also tied with two fellow Republicans -- Theis and Rep. Jim Runestad, R-White Lake -- in voting conservative on 94 percent of the roll call votes selected by ACU. Glenn and Theis share an average score of 95 percent over their first full term, the highest average ranking in the House.

    Click here to see the full ratings and list of legislation graded by ACU in 2016. 

    "ACU researched and selected a range of bills before the Michigan Legislature that determine a member’s adherence to conservative principles," the Washington, D.C.-based group said in a news release announcing the awards.

    "We selected bills that focus on Ronald Reagan’s philosophy of the 'three-legged stool': 1) fiscal and economic: taxes, budgets, regulation, spending, healthcare, and property; 2) social and cultural: 2nd amendment, religion, life, welfare, and education; and 3) government integrity: voting, individual liberty, privacy, and transparency. This wide range of issues are designed to give citizens an accurate assessment that conveys which of Michigan’s elected leaders best defend the principles of a free society: Life, Liberty and Property."

    Glenn after his first year in office was also chosen from among 55 first-term state representatives and senators as 2015 "Freshman Legislator of the Year" by reporters for Michigan Information and Research Service (MIRS), the Capitol's oldest daily news service, based primarily on his leadership on energy and private property rights issues.

    He has also been named a "Guardian of Small Business" by the state chapter of the National Federation of Independent Business and "Legislator of the Year" by both the Associated Builders and Contractors of Michigan and the Michigan Propane Dealers Association.

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    Rep. Gary Glenn was a leader in the campaign to DEFEAT Proposal One, the $2 billion road tax increase overwhelmingly rejected by voters in Bay, Lapeer, and Tuscola counties.

    GG_-_Prop_one.jpgRep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Twp., left, and businessman Paul Mitchell teamedup during a live televised debate on WNEM-TV 5 to urge voters to defeat Proposal One. (Photo by The Saginaw News, March 18, 2015)

    Watch video of the WNEM-TV debate:

    Screen_Shot_2017-11-09_at_9.11.48_AM.png

    Or click here to read the Saginaw News story about Rep. Glenn’s leadership in opposing Proposal One.

    _________________________________________________________________________________

     

    Kevin Daley voted in favor of the $2 billion road tax increase.

    Explaining his vote the next day in the Lapeer County Press, Daley praised the biggest state tax increase in fifty years, calling it “historic” and “sustainable” and saying it would “make for smoother and safer roads.” (Click on image of the full County Press story below, Dec. 21, 2014.)


    Daley_votes_for_Prop_1.png

     

    Thankfully, 80 percent of voters statewide rejected Proposal One on our May 6, 2015 ballot, including 85 percent of voters in Bay County and 88 percent of voters in Lapeer and Tuscola counties.

    Now, three years later, trying to explain away how out of step he was with District 31 voters, former Rep. Daley claimed at a candidate forum Nov. 8th in Lapeer that he supported the massive tax increase not because it was "historic" or "sustainable," as he'd said before, but because it was so bad that he was sure voters would reject it. That's right. He voted for it, he said, because of how bad it was. Does that make sense?

     

    Kevin Daley voted in favor of raising your gas and sales taxes.

    Gary Glenn was a leader in defeating that tax increase.

    How will you vote August 7th?

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    LAPEER COUNTY PRESS: Glenn leads Daley in campaign fundraising

    BY ANDREW DIETDERICH

    LAPEER COUNTY — State Rep. Gary Glenn, R- Williams Twp., jumped out of the gates in the race for the 31st Senate District seat that represents Lapeer County, racking up about $80,000 in his first few days as a candidate.

    That’s compared with the $1,975 his opponent, former Rep. Kevin Daley of Arcadia Township, raised for the entire three-month reporting period.

    Per state law, both had to file campaign finance reports by Oct. 25 for the July 21 to Oct. 20 reporting period.

    Daley announced his candidacy in March. Glenn announced his Oct. 13.

    Both seek the seat currently held by Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville, who is term-limited out of office in 2018. He also could vacate his seat early if a long-rumored appointment to director of Michigan’s U.S. Dept. of Agriculture rural development division ever comes to fruition.

    An appointment could prompt Gov. Rick Snyder to call for a special election that could start with a special primary in early February.

    The 31st District consists of Lapeer, Tuscola and Bay counties.

    “I really wasn’t pushing the money the last two months,” Daley said Friday. “We have fundraisers scheduled now… we’re getting back into it.”

    That isn’t to say Daley hasn’t been engaged in campaigning. He told The County Press he’s been attending various meetings with government officials throughout the district.

    On Friday, he met with the CEOs of hospitals in Tuscola County.

    Glenn did not return a call by press time Friday.

    According to a press release issued by Glenn on Oct. 13, “Green may vacate the seat as soon as (November), a year before the end of his final term, if and when he receives a long-anticipated appointment to a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture…”

    Since early 2017, Green has been rumored next in line for the position of director of Michigan’s U.S. Dept. of Agriculture rural development division — a position appointed by President Donald Trump. Green publicly confirmed in May that was in the running for the job. If he doesn’t get it, he will be term-limited out of office in 2018.

    Should Green be appointed, Glenn said Gov. Rick Snyder could either call for a special election in early 2018 or decide to let the Senate seat remain vacant until filled via the regularly scheduled election next November, leaving Lapeer County without a state senator for about a year.

    At a Lapeer Tea Party meeting on Oct. 3 — and before announcing his candidacy — Glenn hinted at a run and told The County Press “You can’t afford to bet the wrong way if there is going to be a special election in February — that’s four months from now.”

    “Senator Green is under instructions from the White House not to say anything, so he’s not going to tell you anything,” Glenn said Oct. 13. “But we think that appointment may be imminent, and there’s a reasonable expectation of a special election primary the first Tuesday in February.”

    “We were planning to make this announcement one way or another,” Glenn said. “It just turns out that it’s going to be perfectly timed in terms of there being a potential vacancy in the near future.”

    Daley announced his campaign in March when early rumors of Green’s potential employment became more well known.

    As of Oct. 25, Daley had about $46,000 in his campaign coffer compared with Glenn’s almost $72,000.

    During the quarter, Glenn transferred about $50,000 from his House of Representatives’ account. Other contributions totaled $32,450, with the largest — $5,000 — coming from Speaker of the House Tom Leonard’s political action committee.

    He also received $5,000 from the Growth Liberty Enterprise Now Network PAC (GLENN PAC), which is Glenn’s independent PAC that received $8,525 for the reported period. Major contributors to the GLENN PAC were $5,000 from David Kepler of Sanford, $1,000 from Mary Ann Galic of Traverse City, $1,000 from Comcast PAC, $1,000 from Lee Mueller of Edenville, and $500 from William Stockhausen of Northville.

    He also received contributions of $1,000 from Gerald Gora of Bloomfield Hills, $1,000 from Tom Swatzel of Murrells Inlet, S.C., David Dittenber of Freeland, Susie Swatzel of Murrells Inlet, S.C., William Washabaugh of Bay City, Alan Gurski of Bay City, George Galic of Traverse City, Michigan Action Committee for Rural Electrification, and the Michigan Chamber PAC.

    Of 84 individuals and organizations identified in Glenn’s campaign report, none were listed as being from Lapeer County.

    Daley received contributions of $1,000 from Paula Proctor of Lapeer, $500 from the Stamas Leadership Fund, $250 from Kevin Green, supervisor, Algoma Township, and $225 from Todd Muir, owner, Muir Brothers Funeral.

    Click here for the article.

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    Glenn: Almer Twp. court victory affirms local control on wind

    Lansing, Mich. -- Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Twp., Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem and chairman of the state House Energy Policy Committee, Friday congratulated Almer Township officials on their victory in a federal lawsuit over the township's wind energy ordinance, an outcome he said reaffirms local officials' authority to regulate industrial wind development projects. Glenn pledged that as Energy Policy chairman, he "will also block any attempt to pass new state legislation that strips local officials and voters of the authority to decide this contentious issue for themselves."

    "State government should neither mandate or prohibit wind energy development, but instead leave it to local elected officials and ultimately voters themselves to decide what's best for each locality, as voters did on the ballot in twenty local jurisdictions in the Thumb last May," Rep. Glenn said.

    "In that same spirit, the current state law mandating that 15 percent of all power generated in Michigan must be produced by wind or some other 'renewable' resource should be repealed," he said, "returning instead to a free market in which energy producers and consumers alike are free to choose based on market supply and demand, without government interference or intervention in the market."

    Judge Thomas Ludington, federal judge for the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Michigan, Northern Division, Friday ruled in Almer Township's favor in a lawsuit in which the township was sued by Tuscola Wind III, LLC, after township officials declared a moratorium on further wind development while they considered changes to the township's wind ordinance. Tuscola Wind III contended in the suit that township officials had engaged in "exclusionary zoning," a violation of state law.

    Ludington rejected the claim, ruling that the township "reasonably interpreted its zoning ordinance and, under that reasonable interpretation, (the wind developer) was undisputedly in noncompliance with the zoning ordinance. Because at least one of the bases on which the (township) board premised its denial was lawful, ...the township board’s denial will be affirmed."

    Glenn said the federal court ruling will provide direction and relief to other local governments in Bay, Isabella, Lapeer, and Midland counties who are now wresting with the issue in response to wind development proposals.

    He cited Burnside Township in Lapeer County in particular, which ten days ago was notified by EMC Insurance Cos. -- the same company that insures Almer Township -- that Burnside Township's liability coverage will not be renewed solely because township officials are considering adoption of a more restrictive wind development ordinance in response to a possible wind project proposal by Detroit Edison.

    "A costly legal war over wind turbines in northern Lapeer County is such a sure bet that an insurance agent told the Burnside Township Board of Trustees Monday he won’t run the risk of writing an insurance policy for the municipality," the Lapeer County Press reported Oct. 25th.

    Click here to read the County Press article.

    Geoffrey G. Lansky, an agent for EMC Insurance Cos., "pointed out that EMC has covered Ellington and Almer townships in the lawsuits filed by (wind developers)... Lansky said he believes the playbook essentially calls for draining municipalities of finances until local officials eventually capitulate," the County Press reported.

    The County Press further reported that "Lansky put the blame on state lawmakers for increasing mandates for how much electricity originates with renewable energy sources like wind and solar. Per state law, they must produce 15 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2021."

    Glenn has been an outspoken opponent of and last December voted against the legislation that increased the state renewable energy mandate from 10 percent to 15 percent of all energy generated in Michigan. He said his committee will hold a public hearing later this year on legislation to eliminate that state mandate altogether.

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    Rep. Glenn supports guaranteed lower auto insurance rates in Michigan

    GG_testify.jpegState Rep. Gary Glenn today joined the House Insurance Committee in approving legislation that will guarantee auto insurance rate reductions for all Michigan drivers.

    Glenn said the bill should end Michigan’s tenure as the state with the most expensive auto insurance in the nation by offering motorists personal injury protection coverage options, reining in medical costs, fighting fraud and sparking increased competition in the market. All drivers would be guaranteed lower rates on the PIP portion of their policies, with the savings increasing at lower coverage levels.

    The savings could be greatest for seniors, who would not need PIP coverage at all if they already have lifetime health insurance such as Medicare.

    “We’re fixing a broken system with a long overdue mandatory rate reduction and greater freedom of choice for drivers,” Glenn, of Williams Township, said after the vote. “Seniors with Medicare will no longer be forced to buy excess coverage.”

    Glenn noted that some auto insurance companies don’t do business in Michigan because of the state’s current law, but regulators appear confident more companies would enter the market if this bill passes.

    “This legislation would spark additional competition,” Glenn said. “Market forces would help reduce premiums even beyond those prescribed by this legislation.”

    Michigan currently is the only state in the nation mandating drivers buy unlimited personal injury coverage through their auto insurance. The bill approved by the Insurance Committee continues benefits for Michiganders already receiving lifetime health care after a catastrophic traffic accident. The plan also gives drivers the option to continue buying unlimited personal injury protection coverage, or buy more affordable alternative plans.

    All drivers would be guaranteed lower rates on the PIP portion of their policies. The bill calls for a 10 percent reduction for those buying unlimited coverage, a 20 percent drop for those choosing $500,000 in coverage, and a 40 percent drop at $250,000 in coverage.

    “I think it’s the No. 1 issue legislators hear about – drivers are tired of living in the most expensive automobile insurance state in the nation,” Glenn said. “I’m looking forward to an end of that era.”

    House Bill 5013 advances to the House floor for consideration.

    Glenn also announced today that he will hold an auto insurance town hall Nov. 6 at Bay City Western High School. More details about the event will be released soon.

    Click here for news release.

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    Listen to the Gary Glenn for State Senate radio ad featuring Charlton Heston

    Gary Glenn was named co-recipient — with epic Hollywood actor Charlton Heston of St. Helen, Michigan — of the Center for the Study of Market Alternatives’ 1987 “Freedom Fighter of the Year” award. Gary persuaded Heston, a former president of the Screen Actors Guild, AFL-CIO, to appear in television advertisements and campaign events urging voter support for Right to Work.

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    LAPEER COUNTY PRESS: Glenn kicks off Senate campaign in county

    Glenn_announcement.jpgRep. Gary Glenn announces his candidacy for state Senate with Lapeer County supporters.

    "(Rep. Gary) Glenn noted his opposition to — and (former Rep. Kevin) Daley’s support for — Proposal One, (the $2 billion road tax increase) rejected by almost 90 percent of Lapeer County voters in May 2015.

    On his bio, Glenn identifies himself as a 'conservative Republican.' He reiterated the point Friday. 'In looking at the voting record and track record of Lapeer County, it is a conservative county, so I’m your man,' Glenn said.

    ...Ruth Stahl, of North Branch, (wife of former state Rep. John Stahl, R-Arcadia Township) attended in support of Glenn. 'I just feel he’s the man for the job,' Stahl said."

    Mayfield Twp. -- State Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Township, kicked off his campaign for state senate in Lapeer County on Friday, officially declaring intent to win the seat currently held by Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville.

    When the election for the 31st district seat (representing Lapeer, Tuscola, and Bay counties) will be held, however, remains unknown.

    According to a press release issued by Glenn on Friday, “Green may vacate the seat as soon as next month, a year before the end of his final term, if and when he receives a long-anticipated appointment to a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture…”

    Since early 2017, Green has been rumored next in line for the position of director of Michigan’s U.S. Dept. of Agriculture rural development division — a position appointed by President Donald Trump. Green publicly confirmed in May that he’s up for the job. If he doesn’t get it, he will be term-limited out of office and can’t run again in 2018.

    “I’m here today to officially announce my candidacy for the state senate seat made up of Bay, Lapeer, and Tuscola counties,” Glenn said at the Mayfield Township Hall. He had plans to stop in Tuscola and Bay counties later in the day.

    Should Green be appointed, Glenn said Gov. Rick Snyder could either call for a special election in early 2018 or decide to let the Senate seat remain vacant until filled via the regularly scheduled election next November, leaving Lapeer County without a state senator for about a year.

    At a Lapeer Tea Party meeting on Oct. 3, Glenn told The County Press “You can’t afford to bet the wrong way if there is going to be a special election in February — that’s four months from now.” At that meeting, he stopped short of announcing intent to run for the spot.

    That changed just 10 days later.

    “Senator Green is under instructions from the White House not to say anything, so he’s not going to tell you anything,” Glenn said Friday. “But we think that appointment may be imminent, and there’s a reasonable expectation of a special election primary the first Tuesday in February.”

    “We were planning to make this announcement one way or another,” Glenn said. “It just turns out that it’s going to be perfectly timed in terms of there being a potential vacancy in the near future.”

    If the special primary election is called for, Glenn would square off against former state Rep. Kevin Daley, of Arcadia Township, who announced his campaign in March when early rumors of Green’s potential employment became more well-known. A special general election would follow the primary in late March or early April.

    Daley and Glenn have been travelling throughout the district in the last several weeks.

    Re-elected to the state house in 2016, Glenn, 59, spoke Oct. 3 to the Lapeer County Tea Party Patriots at its regular monthly meeting, also held at the Mayfield Township Hall. About 25 people attended, including representatives of Green and U.S. Rep. Paul Mitchell, R-Dryden Township.

    Glenn called the appearance part of a potential “job interview.”

    Glenn talked about various accomplishments, from serving eight years in the U.S. Army Reserves and Army National Guard to his role as president of the American Family Association of Michigan since 1999, during which he co-authored the Marriage Protection Amendment approved by voters in 2004, and as a School Choice project manager for the Mackinac Center for Public Policy.

    Further, he talked about his previous role as chief of staff for a statewide livestock producers and feeders trade association.

    Glenn was first elected to the state House of Representatives in 2014, serving the 98th district that consists of portions of Bay and Midland counties, including the City of Midland.

    He is Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem and chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee, while also serving on the Military and Veterans Affairs, Communications and Technology, and Insurance committees.

    A particular point of pride highlighted by Glenn during his two recent Lapeer visits is his being named 2015 “Freshman Legislator of the Year” by Michigan Information and Research Service (MIRS).

    In announcing his candidacy, Glenn also highlighted some of his work in Lansing, including sponsoring or cosponsoring legislation to:

    • Freeze further enrollment into the Medicaid expansion plan, which he says was the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Michigan.

    • Repeal Michigan’s ballast water release regulations, which Glenn says are blocking development of the Saginaw Bay as a deep water port, which would allow much cheaper shipping costs for the export of farm and manufacturing products produced in mid-Michigan.

    • Repeal so-called “Common Core” standards and allow each local school district to set its own standards.

    • Repeal the requirement for a government fee and permit to carry a concealed weapon.

    • Repeal the senior citizens pension tax.

    Glenn said Friday he was persuaded to run for the state Senate position by “individuals and major area employers who believe my long-term leadership and impact on public policy, especially energy policy, will help make Michigan more competitive in the future for new industry, new agricultural production and processing, and new jobs.”

    In the press release and Lapeer appearance on Friday, Glenn noted his opposition to — and Daley’s support for — Proposal One, rejected by almost 90 percent of Lapeer County voters in May 2015.

    On his bio, Glenn identifies himself as a “conservative Republican.”

    He reiterated the point Friday.

    “In looking at the voting record and track record of Lapeer County, it is a conservative county and so I’m your man,” Glenn said.

    From Williams Township in Bay County, Glenn pointed out that he moved there — and into the state Senate’s 31st district — only recently and because he and his wife became empty nesters, “long before there was any political implication to where we might end up living.”

    Williams Township is about 75 miles from the city of Lapeer.

    If elected, Glenn said he and his representatives will maintain a regular presence in Lapeer County.

    “I plan to be here often, and have staff that would be here and very attentive to Lapeer County,” Glenn said. “Of the three counties, it — if you judge it by the number of people who voted against Proposal One — is the most conservative of the three counties so this is the one where I feel most at home.”

    Twelve people were in attendance at Glenn’s mid-morning announcement.

    Ruth Stahl, of North Branch, attended in support of Glenn. “I just feel he’s the man for the job,” Stahl said. “He’s been around Lansing and Michigan a long time. I feel like he knows what’s going on and will be a great help.”

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    TUSCOLA COUNTY ADVERTISER: Rep. Gary Glenn announces candidacy for state senator

    “I’m here because I believe in Gary Glenn. He stands up for my values, he stands up for what I believe in. ...He’s the right guy for the job. ...I just want to leave with you the fact that he’s the guy I want as our next state senator.”
    Sen. Mike Green

    Glenn_and_Green_II.jpegSen. Mike Green, left, with Rep. Gary Glenn at Glenn's announcement for state Senator in Caro.

    Caro, Mich. -- Michigan state Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Township, announced his candidacy Friday for Michigan’s 31st District State Senate seat.

    Glenn currently represents Michigan’s 98th legislative district, which encompasses portions of Bay and Midland counties. He is the Associate Speaker of the House Pro Tem.

    Glenn made the announcement late Friday morning at the Rolka building, located on State Street (M-81) in Caro.

    “When I look at the attributes that we ought to have in a state senator, I would suggest that we need someone with a track record of proven leadership,” Glenn said at the announcement. “Not just another vote in the House of Representatives.”

    The timing, however, of Glenn’s senate run is unclear. The 31st State Senate District includes Bay, Tuscola and Lapeer counties, and is currently occupied by Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville. In Michigan, state Senate seats are term-limited to two, four-year terms, and Green’s second term will be complete on Jan. 1, 2019.

    But Green may cease being a state senator before that. According to a press release from Glenn’s office, “Green may vacate the seat as soon as next month, a year before the end of his final term, if and when he receives a long-anticipated appointment to a position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, with Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder expected to call a special primary election to fill that vacancy as early as the first Tuesday in February, with a special general election following in late March or early April.”

    Whether Green receives the appointment or not, Glenn will run for Michigan State Senate, he said.

    “I am a candidate for the state senate,” Glenn said. “Either way, if there’s a special election, or whether it’s the normal election cycle.”

    Glenn was joined in Caro Friday by his wife, Annette Glenn, Green and a handful of supporters.

    “I’m here because I believe in Gary Glenn,” Green said. “He stands up for my values, he stands up for what I believe in. He’s probably a little more right of me on a lot of things, but he’s the right guy for the job.”

    Although Green offered his support for Glenn, he couldn’t endorse him officially.
    “I will tell you I can’t give (Glenn) an official endorsement because of where I’m likely to be shortly, hopefully soon,” Green said. “But I just want to leave with you the fact that he’s the guy I want as our next state senator.”

    Glenn was originally elected to the Michigan House of Representatives in 2014, and is in his second term. The term limit on the House is a maximum of three, two-year terms. In addition to being Associate Speaker, Glenn is chairman of the House Energy Policy Committee and serves on the House Communications, Insurance, and Military and Veterans Affairs committees.

    He served in the U.S. Army, which went a long way toward his decision to work in public service.

    “I spent eight years in the Army National Guard and U.S. Army Reserves,” Glenn said. “And I’ve searched my heart as to why I’ve cared so much, so motivated, so passionate about doing my part to help preserve the values on which this country was founded. The answer I came to was having been raised by a World War II Marine who survived the attack on Pearl Harbor.

    “He taught me to love my country, to stand up for what I believe in, and fight for the ones I love.”

    Glenn is a cancer survivor, having been diagnosed about 18 months ago, he said.
    He pointed out that during his initial Michigan House run, he used a familiar slogan.
    “When I first ran for office in 2014 for the state House of Representatives, my slogan was ‘Make Michigan Great Again,’” Glenn said. “That was before (President Donald Trump) used it, but the truth is, I’m sure he and I both stole it from Ronald Reagan in 1980.”

    If the likely scenario occurs where Green is appointed a spot with the Department of Agriculture, then a primary election would happen in early 2018. Glenn would face Kevin Daley, and possibly others, for the Republican candidacy in that primary election. Daley is a former Michigan representative out of Lapeer County.

    “How the numbers break down in the early polling, I will, according to the polls, win substantially in Bay County,” Glenn said. “And Mr. Daley will substantially win Lapeer County and we’ll balance each other out. So Tuscola County gets to pick the next state senator is what it boils down to.”

    Bay County Clerk Cindy Luczak has announced she will run for the 31st District seat as a Democrat in the regular November, 2018 election.

    With a campaign trail now on the horizon, Glenn announced a 40-person-strong organization will spearhead his election efforts in Tuscola County. Mike Green’s son, Phil Green, will serve as chairman of Glenn’s Tuscola County campaign.

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    TUSCOLA COUNTY ADVERTISER: Thumb’s war about wind has left some wounds

    Caro, Mich. -- State Rep. Gary Glenn calls Caro “ground zero” in the battle about wind turbines in Michigan, and by the time he left a town-hall meeting on the topic at Caro High School, he had seen the casualties.

    “I’m going to leave you with this – everywhere that wind turbines go, the social fabric of the community is destroyed. That is the common thread,” Jon Block, president of the Deckerville Community Schools Board of Education, told Glenn at the May 19 meeting, in the school cafeteria.

    Many members of the audience of about 130 people at the meeting applauded the remark by Block, who also is an elected trustee in Marion Township in northeast Sanilac County. A press release from Glenn stated the meeting was expected to focus on future development of wind energy in the Thumb area.

    Earlier in the meeting, Block said he’s “not anti-wind,” noting he has a wind turbine on his property. But he stressed that debate about wind turbines has taken a heavy personal toll.

    “We’ve been drug through the mud – some of our lives have been ruined,” Block said. “You’re talking about people who have been destroyed because of this issue.”

    Glenn asked Block to offer “very specific examples.”

    “A fellow planning commissioner threatened to kill me last year,” Block said. “Is that pretty specific?”

    State legislators voted last year to approve new legislation increasing the amount of state energy coming from renewable sources – such as wind and solar power – from the current standard of 10 percent to 15 percent by 2021.

    Glenn, chairman of the House Energy Policy committee, voted against increasing the standard to 15 percent. DTE Energy announced plans last month for a dramatic increase in wind power as it tries to increase the percentage of its renewable energy provided to customers.

    “I came here tonight opposed to the government mandating that 15 percent of our energy must be developed by renewable energy, and I came out of this meeting all the more opposed,” said Glenn, whose 98th district includes land in parts of Bay and Midland counties.

    “What I learned here tonight is this is not just an economic issue, and not just a private property-rights issue, but an issue of social fabric,” Glenn said. “I’m going to communicate that back to my colleagues on the (House) Energy Committee in Lansing – about the social effects (of the wind-turbine debate), not just the economic effects.”

    Late last year, Gov. Rick Snyder signed the law into effect that increases the renewable-energy standard to 15 percent.

    “I wish the governor were here to see the effect on the social fabric of the community – not just the questions of what kind of energy are we going to have, or private-property rights, or the economic cost, but the social cost,” Glenn said after the town-hall meeting.

    “I’d like to see this message, and this crowd, duplicated on the steps of the Capitol, or in the Capitol rotunda, and have that same school-board member communicate that same message to Gov. Snyder in Lansing,” Glenn said.

    Should state tweak laws?

    Scores of wind turbines have been built in recent years in Huron, Tuscola and Sanilac counties. Voters in all three counties on May 2 issued decisions that weren’t favorable to wind-turbine developers.

    Opponents of wind turbines in Tuscola County claim DTE Energy plans to build 3,500 new turbines in Michigan – 50 turbines in 70 new townships.

    Mike Pattullo, a resident of Tuscola County’s Ellington Township, told Glenn that state legislators need to pass conflict-of-interest rules preventing public officials from deciding issues or ordinances regarding energy development when those officials receive financial benefits from energy developers – such as leasing their land to the developers.

    Pattullo also recommended approval of “transparency laws” requiring energy developers to publish in a newspaper the names of those landowners who have signed leases with energy developers, such as companies proposing wind turbines.

    “Somehow, we have to put some pressure on these gigantic wind developers to use some ethics, some honor, when they’re dealing with these small communities,” Pattullo said. “They come into these little townships that have five people sitting on that township planning commission that have never decided anything more than where to put a pole barn, or how much gravel to put on a road.

    “And now they’re being asked to do what? Basically, design an oil refinery – right down to the pipe size. They’re just going to go by whatever the wind developer, and their engineering company – who happens to work with them on every project – say.

    “That’s the model, but that model, going forward, will be a disaster for 50 turbines per 70 townships.”

    Norm Stephens, a resident of Tuscola County’s Almer Township, estimated that wind turbines have been built in about 30 townships in Michigan.

    “From what I can find, actually, every one of those (townships) has some level of conflict of interest at the (township) board level, the planning commission level or on the zoning board of appeals,” Stephens told the audience.

    “Is there anybody here that can tell me there’s some place in the state that has wind turbines where not one of those three areas has some type of conflict of interest, where somebody has a wind lease (with an energy developer)?”

    No one in the audience gave an answer.

    “Every one of those townships has conflict of interest – that’s really important, Gary,” Stephens told Glenn.

    Ellington Township resident David Vollmar, however, told Glenn that opponents of wind energy have demonstated conflicts of interest in Tuscola County’s Almer and Ellington townships.

    “You’ve been hearing a lot of lies here today,” Vollmar said. “Property lines on the zoning ordinance in Almer Township is (a wind turbine must be) 1,500 feet from a property line – that is the ordinance.”

    Most incumbents on township boards of trustees in Almer and Ellington townships were replaced in the November 2016 election with members of an anti-wind group, the Ellington-Almer Township Concerned Citizens, according to Vollmar.

    “That is conflict of interest – they belong to a group, an anti-wind group, and most of ’em’s here tonight,” Vollmar said.

    Vollmar, who is a leaseholder with a wind developer proposing to build turbines in Ellington Township, said that in Ellington Township, four of the five current township board members belonged to the concerned citizens’ group prior to the November election that saw those four candidates win election.

    “They all been ag’in windmills,” Vollmar said. “Now that is all conflict of interest. There is no ethics for them people whatsoever. None.”

    Glenn then asked Vollmar a question.

    “Will any of the members of this anti-wind organization who got elected make any money, depending on how they voted on an ordinance?” Glenn said.

    “Who knows?” Vollmar replied, calling the four new members of the Ellington Township Board of Trustees elected in November of 2016 a “crooked board.”

    Even ‘honorable men’ questioned

    Keith Aeder, supervisor of Tuscola County’s Fairgrove Township, told Glenn of difficulties his township faced regarding wind turbine development.

    “We had a planning commission that had conflicts – we recognized that right off the get-go,” Aeder said. “We tried to appoint alternates to our board to get around this issue and get these people out of this position. But it’s illegal – we can’t do that.

    “We have no other option. … Either that or we kick them off this planning commission that they’ve served on for 15 or 20 or 30 years.”

    Aeder referred to the planning commission members as “honorable men.”

    “I can speak for my (township) board that I feel strongly that they were still looking out for the good of property owners – there are people that are trying to protect other people’s property rights,” Aeder said.

    “We certainly appreciate the small landowners. I’m one of those small landowners. I personally don’t like the windmills, but at the same time, I feel like I have to try to protect everybody’s rights.”

    Aeder urged Glenn to change state law to allow townships to respond to proposed turbine development when one or more township officials have a conflict of interest.

    “How do you get away from having people that don’t have a conflict?” Aeder asked Glynn. “It’s very, very difficult. … What do you do about a company that comes in and they may have a ‘pool arrangement,’ where everybody (in a township) benefits (financially)?”

    “It’s called a bribe,” said a woman in the audience.

    Vollmar contended that in Almer Township, no wind turbines can be built south of Fairgrove Road. A man in the audience disagreed, claiming a wind turbine is planned near the corner of Cameron and Deckerville roads.

    “Half the people complain who won’t even see a windmill unless they go for a ride,” Vollmar said. “It’s way out in the farmland, way away from Caro. There’s a few houses around there, but most of the people I talk to in those houses don’t mind. A few do, yes.”

    Pattullo said that in the months prior to the 2016 elections, Ellington Township elected officials approved “probably the weakest ordinance (regarding wind turbines) maybe anywhere in the state in the last five years.”

    Pattullo said the ordinance allows a noise level of an average 55 decibels at a home. Pattullo said a group of residents “confronted” Ellington Township officials about the ordinance about 18 months ago.

    “Fast forward, almost a year and a half now, it’s been hell,” Pattullo said. “I’ve stopped counting at 50 meetings that I’ve been to – every one of them as tense and stressful as the previous one.

    “I think the lady from (Huron County’s) Meade Township said (wind developers) basically find the people that will be their bullies, and I don’t know, but you see some true colors that are just amazing. We see ’em in our churches, you run across them everywhere – in stores.

    “My point of all this is we have somehow, by five or six miracles in a row, stopped this insane ordinance in Ellington Township and in neighboring Almer Township, through elections and through everything civil we could do.”

    Pattullo said residents in the two townships continue trying to toughen their ordinances regarding wind-turbine development.

    “We’re still trying to change our ordinances to get them at least up to something maybe that Huron County would have discarded four years ago because they weren’t good enough,” Pattullo said. “Ours are still even worse than that.

    “Now we’re to the point where we have these gigantic companies, with their armies of lawyers, trying to sue us into submission. We’re only going to have so much resources. We only have so many people around this community that will continue to stand up. The bullying is pretty serious and it scares a lot of people away.

    “We’ve come pretty close to needing temporary restraining orders, all that kind of stuff.”

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